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20120928
20121006
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
waged a campaign to get jim lehrer of pbs who will be posted the first presidential election to ask the question about gun violence. another. you don't hear much debate between the republican candidate mitt romney and president obama -- we will open up the debate and expand the debate as we so often do on "democracy now, "to a third party candidates. we will be in denver, to and we will have third-party candidates responding to the same questions being put to mitt romney and president obama. we will broadcast democracy now.org and on radio as well. you raised the issue of the critical vote as we traveled through pennsylvania. a whole issue of voter suppression and having been in charlotte, a great civil-rights city, where the students from the historical black college in 1960 set up a lunch counter in to grant them and yet, what do we see today? state after state, efforts to suppress voting rights instead of expanding them. not enough people vote in this country. in pennsylvania, there is legislation now on the books that could disenfranchise between 750,000-1 million people. presid
with student loans and those issues like that. mitt romney had mentioned shutting off pbs, which broadly to think about the fact that that is one station on television that does help other people. how to break it down and help other people that do not understand. i think that was another thing that -- the fact that a lot of the times they were talking about the tax and economy, that was like beating a dead horse. people brought up how obama was saying the same thing. i think that is because they are beating the issue like a dead horse. you have to come up with something else to explain the economy. host: what did you do? caller: i am a student. host: do you go to fed vale state -- fayetteville state? caller: i'm from new york state. host: thank you for calling in. judy is from north carolina, mitt romney supporter. caller: good morning. host: what did you think of the debate? caller: i did not think it went far enough in some of the engines. i have watched over the health care situation. i have read up and have had help to try to decipher a lot of it. hospitals being fined because patien
arena. i am jim lehrer from the pbs newshour and i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates between president barack obama, the democratic nominee and former massachusetts gov. mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate is sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues and it will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15- minute segments with the first question and then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment semtex or questions via the internet and other means. but i made the final selections. for the record, they were not submitted for approval to the commission for the candidates. the segments, as i announced in advance will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and the governing with an emphasis throughout on differences, specifics, and choices. both candidates also have to- minute closing statements. there is a noise exception right now as we welcome president obama and
with all respect. i will get rid of that. i will stop the subsidy to pbs. i like pbs. i like big bird. i cannot keep spending money to borrow from china to pay for it. i will take programs that are good programs but will be run more officially at the state level. i'll make government more efficient and cut back the number of employees and combine some agencies. my cutbacks will be done through attrition. the president said he would cut the deficit in half. he doubled it. trillion-dollar deficits for the last four years. the president has put in place almost as much debt held by the public as all prior presidents combined. >> when i walked into the oval office i had more than a trillion dollar deficit greeting me. we know where it came from. two wars paid for on a credit card, two cuts that are not pay for, programs that were not paid for, a massive economic crisis. despite that, yes, we had to take some emergency measures to make sure we did not slip into a great depression. let's make sure we are cutting out things that are not helping us grow. 77 government programs from aircrafts that
line for democrats. caller: good morning, i am a big fan of amy goodman. i saw a documentary on pbs for what was called free elections that i have not had a chance to really look at it. it is about getting the votes to the people where they have to be obliged to the people. that is one thing. i would like to see cspan to start on that. every time i see wal-mart commercials and they talk about feeding the hungry and talk about how much money they have raised, it makes me so angry when they won't even pay their people a living wage. if we had a living wage, we would not have to have people on food stamps and we would not have to have people struggling. host: before i get a response, what would be your definition of a living wage? guest it is different for every area. caller: in our area, look much housing is. you cannot make enough money to even rent a home. one more thing -- i love president obama but my anger is when they went into the negotiations for health care, they took the public auction off the table. to me, that is the foundation of it. like she said about medicare for all,
is jim lehrer of pbs. the debate is structured into a series of 15 minute questions, many focusing on the economy. the economy gets the first half of the debate, with questions 1, two, and 3. then they move on to the topic of health care, which has major economic impact, the role of government in our society, and the final segment will be on the governing cells of the candidates. jim lehrer can assign the final questions. there was a coin toss to decide who would take the first question. president obama has won that and will take the first question. we would like to involve you in the process and talk about this important debate, what you will be looking for from candidates, whether or not you have already made your decision. most particularly, if you had a chance to ask a question on this domestic policy debate, what would you most want to know from these two men? let's introduce you to our first guest. from inside the debate are -- the senior political reporter for yahoo news, who has been on the campaign trail with governor romney. >let me start with a pc filed recently, is sens
of that. i will stop the subsidy to pbs. i like pbs. i like big bird. i cannot keep spending money to borrow from china to pay for it. i will take programs that are good programs but will be run more officially at the state level. i'll make government more efficient and cut back the number of employees and combined some agencies. my cutbacks will be done through attrition. the president said he would cut the deficit in half. he doubled it. trillion dollar deficit for the last four years. the president has put in place almost as much debt held by the public as all prior presidents combined. >> when i walked into the oval office i had more than a trillion dollar deficit treating me. we know where it came from. two were -- wars pay for on a credit card. those quote tax cuts that are not pay for. programs that were not paid for. a massive economic crisis. despite that, yes, we had to take some emergency measures to make sure we did not slip into a great depression. let's make sure we are cutting out things that are not helping us grow. sunday 7 government programs from aircraft that th
with all respect. >> i love it. >> i will stop subsidies to pbs. i will not keep spending money on things to borrow money to pay for it. i will take programs that are currently good programs, but if you run more efficiently at the state level. number three, i will make government more efficient and cut back the number of employees. i will combine some agencies and departments. cutbacks will be done through attrition. this is the approach we need to take to balance the budget. the president said he would cut the deficit in half. unfortunately, he doubled it. he has put in place almost as much of debt held by the public as all prior presidents combined. >> here is one of many big bird related tweets -- here are some facebook comments. nextnext up is jerramy. >> i really like obama is plan on health care and i really like that he wants lower taxes for the middle class. >> next up clinton from south carolina, democrat. >> i believe that barack obama was foremost the best in the debate. he talked about being for the middle class. he is for the poor man. the rich is already rich. why keep the p
"washington post" columnist kathleen parker, msnbc's chris jansing and reporters from news however on pbs and >> we are going to start. this is our subterfuge to keep ahead. we will eat later. on time. i want to talk about our noisemaker lunch's end where they came from. we started those by celebrating a story that we used to do in the december issue called the noisemakers where we pick and women that made a lot of noise every year. the idea would be that they may not be the goody goody people, but they were out there rocking the boat, saying things that were important, shaking things up and changing your opinions. what we found was that all of our noisemakers sort of worm their way into all the pages of the magazine. all the women of style and substance are noisemakers, and they are always bugging convention and they refused to sit down and be quiet. what we said was, our readers love to see real women. there is probably not a model in the magazine at all. in daylight to see them in a close because they can relate. we don't have any models in the magazine anymore and what we decided to d
saw a documentary on pbs for what was called free elections that i have not had a chance to really look at it. it is about getting the votes to the people where they have to be obliged to the people. that is one thing. i would like to see cspan to start on that. every time i see wal-mart commercials and they talk about feeding the hungry and talk about how much money they have raised, it makes me so angry when they won't even pay their people a living wage. if we had a living wage, we would not have to have people would not have to have people on
to play video of may 3 of the houston pbs forum when you are asked, do you want to do away with bush tax-cut? >> the very thing we will have to do -- we will have to let the bush tax cuts go. in order to pay down the national debt. at the end of the day, if you look at the budget, a look at the budget you get down to military and defense spending or the bush tax cuts. >> are you talking about the bush tax cuts on all income levels? >> there is no qualification in that statement. what i said, and i still stand by, there are three things that doubled on national debt -- the bush tax cuts, -- >> the question is, do you want to expire them in total? there was no qualification. >> i am getting there. i think, and i still say, that we have to look at every single one of them and determine if we can use some of that money to pay down our national debt. we can lie to the american people or tell the truth. the truth is that those tax cuts, if we let them expire, will increase our national debt by almost one-half. >> what is your position, mr. cruz? >> i would not allow the bush tax cuts to expire
, and president george bush, the republican nominee. i am jim lehrer of the macneil- lehrer news hour on pbs, and i will be the moderator for this 90-minute event, which is taking place before an audience in the athletic complex on the campus of washington university in st. louis, missouri. three journalists will be asking questions tonight. they are john mashek of the boston globe, ann compton of abc news, and sander vanocur, a freelance journalist. we will follow a format agreed to by representatives of the clinton and bush campaigns. that agreement contains no restrictions on the content or subject matter of the questions. each candidate will have up to 2 minutes for a closing statement. the order of those, as well as the questioning, was determined by a drawing. the first question goes to mr. perot. he will have 2 minutes to answer, to be followed by rebuttals of one minute each from governor clinton and then president bush. gentlemen, good evening. the first topic tonight is what separates each of you from the other. mr. perot, what do you believe tonight is the single most important se
at the university of massachusetts in boston. i'm jim lehrer of the newshour on pbs, and i welcome you to the first of three 90-minute debates between the democratic candidate for president, vice president al gore and the republican candidate, governor george w. bush of texas. the debates are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates and they will be conducted within formats and rules agreed to between the commission and the two campaigns. we'll have the candidates at podiums. no answer to a question can exceed two minutes. rebuttal is limited to one minute. but as moderator i have the option to follow up and to extend any particular give and take another three-and-a-half minutes. even then, no single answer can exceed two minutes. the candidates under their rules may not question each other directly. there will be no opening statements, but each candidate may have up to two minutes for a closing statement. the questions and the subjects were chosen by me alone. i have told no one from the two campaigns, or the commission, or anyone else involved what they are. there is a small audience i
on a pbs station for the people who cannot afford satellite. you do great things for education. i would like to ask him as a rural person, who has a highway that barely fits two cars, why should i have to pay for transit when i will never in my lifetime ever going to use it? my mother is 95. she has never been on a train in her life. and why do my tax dollars have to find something like that when it does no good whatsoever for us? and when you give us tax dollars to drive back and forth to work -- and will you give us tax dollars to drop back and forth to work and to the doctor and of that? guest: i would just repeat that this is a national system and there are local interests as well. i'm not saying that the federal government should pay 100% of the chicago transit and rail system. but there is a national interest. you may not use the chicago system, or that the system in phoenix or denver. by you have an interest, as all americans do, in assuring that metropolitan regions have a prosperous economies. i do not know if you're on a state highway or not, but there is a tremendous amount o
primaries. my condolences. she appears on the brian lair show and has contributed to npr, bbc, and pbs. next to her as greg marx, co- editor of our selling state product. if you have seen his riding -- writings, he is doing some interesting commentary on how the campaign is being conducted. finally, my old colleague at newsday. a columnist at newsday and a political analyst for the fox news channel. ellis henican is the author of "home team." and "in the blink of an eye." of stormyvoice i on 2021. about we will give the floor to michael howe and his presentation which will give some material to react on. it is all yours. >> thank you. i am happy to be here. i would like to think -- thank aj for inviting me. we are analyzing election from a data perspective. we believe that we are going from the perspective of data being apolitical. we are measuring influence, the amplification of media and sources and journalists with in the election coverage. we have a unique methodology by which we are doing that measurement. be in just of the traditional print and broadcast. on the video shot -- on the ra
of the pbs news hour. this is a spin room where the media works. it will be far busier in 12 hours time. the debate itself begins at 9:00 eastern time. some 3000 reporters and support staff are expected to be on site. the university of denver otherwise known as d.u. vying for a chance to host one of these debates. we go now for some perspective on the debate and where they fit into the political process with robert anderson, a political science professor at columbia university. good morning and thanks for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> where do debates fit in? how important is it? guest: the base can play an important role. they probably take second place to conventions. they play a much greater role in changing people's minds. they probably play a lesser role when people are finally making up their minds. also, very early in the election year, when voters are just learning, there is a lot of volatility. the debate divides the time line. there are changes in the polls the only slightly greater than normally. host: there is a story from "the wall street journal" what do viewe
to borrow money from china to pay for things. i will cut pbs. i will take programs that are currently good programs but i think would be more efficiently run at the state level. number three, i will make government more efficient and cut back the number of employees. i would cut back agencies and departments. my cutbacks will be done through attrition, by the way. this is the approach we have to take. the president said he would cut the deficit in half. unfortunately he doubled it. trillion dollar deficits for the last four years. the president has put us in almost as much debt held by the public as all former presidents combined. >> when i walked into the oval office, i had more than a trillion dollar debt. we know where it came from. two wars paid for on the credit card, two tax cuts not paid for, and a whole bunch of programs that were not paid for, and then a massive economic crisis. despite that, what we have said is, yes, we had to take initial emergency measures to make sure we didn't slip into a great depression. what we have also said is let's make sure we are cutting out those th
expire? i want to play video from the houston pbs forum when you are asked, do you want to do away with bush tax cuts? >> the very thing we will have to do -- we will have to let the bush tax cuts go. in order to pay down the national debt. at the end of the day, if you look at the budget, a look at the budget you get down to military and defense spending or the bush tax cuts. >> are you talking about the bush tax cuts on all income levels? >> there is no qualification in that statement. what i said, and i still stand by, there are three things that doubled on national debt -- the bush tax cuts, -- >> the question is, do you want to expire them in total? there was no qualification. >> i am getting there. i think, and i still say, that we have to look at every single one of them and determine if we can use some of that money to pay down our national debt. we can lie to the american people or tell the truth. the truth is that those tax cuts, if we let them expire, will increase our national debt by almost one-half. >> what is your position, mr. cruz? >> i would not allow the bush tax
in the face and said "i am going to cut pbs." i think the president just stood back and let it romney talk. i am not a middle-aged woman. i have been on disability now for a -- i am a middle-aged woman. i've been on disability now for about eight years to hear -- for about eight years. during the president's term, i've been able to go to college and i'm able to open my own small business next year, because i am able to go out on my own and purchase medical insurance because of the pre- existing condition that i've had since i was a teenager. i am finally at the point where i can have the dignity of having my own insurance, instead of being abandoned, 47% or whatever that romney would like to call me. also, with the economic patriotism, that is the most beautiful thing i think i have heard the president say. >> that is one of the, is the president made last night. the speech in denver is the first of the date for the president. he will head out to madison, wisconsin. it is also the first of the post-debate coverage here on c- span. mitt romney and paul ryan will be in virginia for a rally this
. chris jansing, host of msnbc's jansing and company. host of the pbs news hour, and they more contributing editor. maggie haberman, and nora o'donnell. we will give a shout out to helene cooper who is in the piece and had to be on the bus today. and our last best can't be here today. and we are sad about that. i want to start with a few questions, but i really want asked after sitting here next everybody finding out that it is a very incestuous group and they all have secrets about each other. i'm going to be kind and stick to our point which was talking about the election. given the explosion of social media today, as we know, we had to take our second round of photos not just for prints, but the photographer moved out and everybody went out there. how is it easier or harder to do your job today covering candidates? what kind of pressure does that put on your business? john bed and i will ask laura to start. >> when you talked about sharing secrets, chris looked over. like, i know a lot about you, nora. we go way back. i was probably one of the first people on twitter, and i
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)